British Columbia

Ottawa provides $2M for programs to prevent violent extremism in B.C.

The federal government is providing $2 million in funding over five years to develop programs to prevent people from becoming radicalized in B.C.

'Shift' program will work with municipalities, law enforcement and community organizations

The announcement was made on Tuesday by Ron McKinnon, MP for Coquitlam-Port Coquitlam, on behalf of Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Ralph Goodale. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

The federal government is providing $2 million in funding over five years to develop programs to prevent people from becoming radicalized in B.C.

The announcement was made on Tuesday by Ron McKinnon, MP for Coquitlam-Port Coquitlam, on behalf of Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Ralph Goodale.

According to a press release, the program, called "Shift," will work with municipal governments, community-based organizations and law enforcement to "prevent radicalization to violence in the province, by engaging vulnerable individuals and developing intervention strategies tailored to them."

It's currently slated to run from 2018 to 2022.

'1 violent act can result in tragic consequences'

The project will "apply best practices from existing intervention programs and initiatives across the country, and evaluate their effectiveness in reducing violent extremism," according to the release.

The funding will go to the Ministry of Public Safety and Solicitor General in B.C., and come from the Community Resilience Fund.

In the statement, minister of public safety and solicitor general Mike Farnworth said the funding will ensure that people at risk of being radicalized to violence get the services they need.

"While we know that the rate of people becoming radicalized to violence in B.C. is quite low, we also know and have seen in multiple instances around the world, that just one violent act can result in tragic consequences," he said. 

"Supporting these efforts at a local level is key to successful prevention."

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