British Columbia

6 protesters arrested after blocking parts of Hwy 1 during morning rush hour

Morning commuters in the North Shore were disrupted on Monday as old-growth protesters blocked traffic on the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge and near the Horseshoe Bay ferry terminal.

Save Old Growth says members "superglued" themselves to the road

Save Old Growth members said they "superglued" themselves to the road to block the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge and Horseshoe Bay ferry terminal on Monday morning. (SOG media)

Morning commuters in the North Shore were disrupted on Monday as old-growth protesters blocked traffic on the Ironworkers Memorial Bridge and near the Horseshoe Bay ferry terminal.

Police said a total of six people were arrested after the protests were cleared.

Save Old Growth campaign organizer Brent Eichler said six of the group's members "superglued" themselves to the road.

"We had three people glued to the ... middle of the bridge and three people glued to Highway 1 outside the Horseshoe Bay ferry terminal," Eichler told CBC News. 

Reports that the eastbound lane over the bridge was blocked by protesters began coming in around 8 a.m. PT. 

Just after 8:30 a.m. PT, North Vancouver RCMP posted on social media that police were working on clearing the protesters, and the highway was deemed clear shortly before 8:45 a.m. 


Around 8:10 a.m., West Vancouver Police Department reported that westbound traffic on Highway 1 was being blocked near the ferry terminal. The highway was deemed clear around an hour later.


CBC News confirmed that three people were arrested at the bridge, and another three at the ferry terminal.

Protest co-ordinator Zain Haq said not much has changed since 1,100 arrests were made in Vancouver Island's Fairy Creek watershed over the issue of old-growth logging, so activists are now bringing the protests to high-visibility urban areas.

Activists have vowed to continue their protests until all old-growth forests are protected.

"We don't have any other option other than civil resistance at this point," Haq said. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David P. Ball

Journalist

David P. Ball is a multimedia journalist with CBC News in Vancouver. He has previously reported for the Toronto Star, Agence France-Presse, and The Tyee, and has won awards from the Canadian Association of Journalists and Jack Webster Foundation. You can send story tips or ideas to david.ball@cbc.ca, or contact him on Twitter.

With files from Christina Jung

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