British Columbia

New Grouse Grind rangers to keep an eye on hikers

Hikers on the North Vancouver's Grouse Grind will now be under the watchful eye of two rangers, but officials say they won't be policing the route.

Two new rangers will be there to help hikers, not police, popular trail, says Metro Vancouver officials

Andrew Warn and Josie Hunter are the two rangers who have been hired by Metro Vancouver to help people in need on the Grouse Grind. (CBC)

Hikers on the North Vancouver's Grouse Grind will now be under the watchful eye of two rangers, but officials say they won't be policing the route.

The two rangers have been hired by Metro Vancouver to help people in need, according to spokesperson Bob Cavill.

"Just make people aware of being prepared, being hydrated, wearing proper footwear, that type of thing and helping them out in terms of what's required in terms of a good healthy hike up the grind."

Cavill says this is a trial run and will last for one year.

"Sometimes we may split them up, and other times they will be working together."

With 2,830 steps, the Grouse Grind trail is often call Mother's Natures stair master. (Grouse Mountain)

The rangers are on the job already, but they're just waiting for their official uniforms to arrive.

"While they won't be carrying injured hikers out, the rangers will be able to offer some first aid assistance and liaise with district firefighters and North Shore Rescue when more technical rescues are needed," said one of the rangers, Josie Hunter.

The Grind hasn't had rangers before, but North Shore Rescue has carried out sweeps at the end of every hiking day to make sure no one is lost.

"The ranger's job is to just make people aware of being prepared, being hydrated, wearing proper footwear, that type of thing and helping them out in terms of what's required in terms of a good healthy hike up the Grind," said the other ranger Andrew Warn. 

Cavill says there is no intention for the rangers to police the Grind.

"We hope what we can do with them being there is to reduce any potential for illness or injury."

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