Neptune Terminals worker falls to his death in North Vancouver

Neptune Terminals says one of its workers died in a fall Wednesday morning. WorkSafe BC and the B.C. Coroners Office are investigating.

'Experienced' worker died Wednesday at Vancouver's Neptune Terminals on the North Shore

Aerial view of Neptune Terminals on Burrard Inlet in North Vancouver (Neptune Terminals)

Neptune terminals has revealed  numerous investigations are underway after one its workers died in a fall at its North Vancouver bulk shipping site.

In a statement to media, Neptune Terminals said the fatal accident occurred at approximately 7:45 a.m. PT. Wednesday.  

"The individual involved was an experienced Ironworker employed by Termel Industries Ltd. and was performing work at the terminal, " the company said in a news release.

"We are deeply saddened by this incident. Our primary concern is for the family and friends of the individual, as well as employees of Neptune and our contractors who have been affected by this tragic incident. Counselling support is being offered to those impacted."

North Vancouver RCMP say they were called to the scene Wednesday morning, but turned the investigation over to WorkSafeBC and the B.C. Coroner's office.

Cpl. Richard De Jong describes the victim as a 55 to 60-year-old man, who fell approximately eight metres to his death.

WorkSafeBC says four of its investigators were still on scene Thursday at 1001 Low Level Road in North Vancouver.

Neptune Terminals says it's conducting an active investigation in conjunction with WorkSafeBC and Termel — a mechanical, structural steel and sheet metal contractor serving the bulk handling port.

On its web site, Neptune Terminals states "Safety is our number one priority. We want to ensure that our employees return home to their families each night. Neptune Terminals follows stringent safety standards and is considered an industry leader on the Vancouver waterfront, having achieved one of the best safety records over the past seven years."

Neptune Terminals ships Canadian potash and steel–making coal to markets around the world, according to its website.

It employs approximately 300 people a day, with plans to increase that to 400.