British Columbia

NEB CEO Peter Watson heckled by Kinder Morgan pipeline protesters

The National Energy Board's CEO Peter Watson met with Metro Vancouver mayors about concerns over the consultation process for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Burnaby mayor worried over Kinder Morgan survey work in parks

Protesters heckled the National Energy Board's CEO Peter Watson, who was in town to meet with Metro Vancouver mayors about concerns over the consultation process for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion (CBC)

Protesters heckled the National Energy Board's CEO Peter Watson, who was in town to meet with Metro Vancouver mayors about concerns over the consultation process for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

Watson was heckled by protesters when he said he deeply cares about people, land and water. 

Metro Vancouver does not have an official position on the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, but Vancouver Mayor Gregor Robertson told Watson there is lack of public confidence in the NEB

​Watson told the mayors he wants a better relationship with them, but Burnaby Mayor Derek Corrigan called the whole process a sham

'Minimally intrusive inspection'

Corrigan says he's concerned energy firm Kinder Morgan could do more survey work for its proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in the region's parks — after a briefing note intended for mayors only was accidentally posted online.

Burnaby mayor Derek Corrigan worries Kinder Morgan's "minimally intrusive" survey work in Metro Vancouver parks will lead to more intrusive work. (Simon Charland/CBC)
The note from Metro Vancouver lists 10 properties where the oil giant could get a licence to do work related to its oil pipeline expansion project, including Surrey Bend Park and Colony Farm Park in Port Coquitlam.

"I think right now, Metro is looking for the path of least resistance to just simply allow them to go through as long as they don't harm the park," Corrigan, a vocal opponent of the Trans Mountain pipeline, told The Early Edition's Rick Cluff.

Last fall, the City of Burnaby went to court seeking an injunction in an attempt to stop Kinder Morgan from doing survey work on Burnaby Mountain. That injunction was rejected.

The survey work was also met with opposition from thousands of protestors.

Corrigan said the new survey work will be different from what happened at Burnaby — and Kinder Morgan will be limited to a "minimally intrusive inspection."

"Metro has said that they can't so much as harm a piece of shrubbery, that they can't so much as tie a ribbon on one of the shrubs," he said.

"I suspect though that they're going to want to move to the next stage very quickly and want to do more."

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