British Columbia

Miley Cyrus weighs in on 'loophole' in B.C.'s proposed ban on trophy hunting

Pop star Miley Cyrus is once again weighing in on a controversial environmental issue in B.C. by adding her voice to a new campaign that's calling for the end to all grizzly bear hunting in B.C.

The pop star has joined a campaign calling for a full ban on grizzly bear hunting

American pop singer Miley Cyrus is joining the chorus of activists that are calling for a full ban on all grizzly bear hunting in B.C. (Pacific Wild)

Pop star Miley Cyrus is once again weighing in on a controversial environmental issue in B.C. by adding her voice to a new campaign that's calling for the end to all grizzly bear hunting in B.C.

Cyrus has joined with Pacific Wild — a non-profit conservation group dedicated to the Great Bear Rainforest — on a campaign called #SaveBCBears that calls for the preservation of grizzly bears in this province.

"The grizzly bear is the second slowest reproducing land mammal in North America, one that's threatened throughout much of its natural range and habitat," said Ian McAllister, executive director at Pacific Wild.

As part of the campaign, Miley Cyrus recorded a rendition of the children's song, The Teddy Bears' Picnic. The video is set against the backdrop of an empty wilderness.

The campaign calls for others to record their own rendition of the song and to post it to social media.

Miley Cyrus and her brother, Braison, near the Great Bear Rainforest on the Central Coast of British Columbia. They two travelled to the region in 2015 as part of a campaign against the province's wolf cull. (Pacific Wild )

It's not the first time Cyrus has waded into environmental politics in B.C.

In 2015, she took aim at the province's wolf cull, asking her Instagram followers to to sign a petition launched by Pacific Wild, calling for an end to the practice.

Former B.C. premier Christy Clark responded to the pop star, saying she should "stick to twerking."

Cyrus then traveled to the Great Bear Rainforest with her brother to tour the area and meet with conservationists.

Laws and the loophole

In August, the B.C. government announced it was introducing a ban on trophy hunting, citing a shift in public opinion in the province.

Forests Minister Doug Donaldson said the ban will come into effect Nov. 30, 2017.

The ban will end all grizzly bear hunting in the coastal region known as the Great Bear Rainforest. However, hunting for grizzly bear meat outside that area will still be allowed.

A grizzly in the Great Bear Rainforest near Hartley Bay. (Tim McGrath)

McAllister calls this a "loophole" in the proposed law because trophy hunters outside the region will be able to remove a portion of meat from a bear's carcass and claim the kill as food.

"We're hoping this campaign will prompt the government to close this loophole and help the government hear the opinion of over 90 per cent of British Columbians who wish to see a total and complete end to this barbaric hunt."

No law, no loophole

Donaldson was not available for comment on Wednesday but, in a statement, said the ministry is still working on the proposed law.

"Ministry staff are currently consulting with key stakeholders on policies and regulations necessary to support the closure," the statement read.

When asked about the so-called "loophole," the ministry responded by saying because the new laws aren't yet in effect, there is no loophole.

"The intent is to have the policy and regulatory framework in place before the end of the year."

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