British Columbia

Mice, rats and raccoons want to hide from the cold in your home

Dropping temperatures mean critters like mice, rats, squirrels, and even raccoons are looking for a warm place to live.

Mice can squeeze into your home through a hole the size of a dime.

Rodents like mice often head indoors when the weather becomes cooler and sometimes that means settling into people's homes. (CBC)

Dropping temperatures mean critters like mice, rats, squirrels, and even raccoons are looking for a warm place to live.

Mike Londry, Owner of Westside Pest Control, gave Rick Cluff of CBC Radio One's The Early Edition a few tips on how to tell if you have a rodent problem and how to prevent them from settling down in your home.

1. Look throughout your home for holes.  

Mice can squeeze through a hole as small as a dime. Don't forget to look up because squirrels usually enter through the roof according to Londry.

2. Mice are more likely than rats to cohabitate with people, even in kitchens.

Rats are just as afraid of people as we are of them, and they usually have an established food source outside the home, according to Londry.

3. If it sounds like there's a person in your attic, it's likely a raccoon.

"I've seen raccoons tear shingles right off the roof of a house. They know that it's a warm and dry place to live," said Londry.

Raccoons make more of a thumping noise as opposed to scratching, which can mean a rodent infestation.

4. Call a professional if you have a rodent problem.

Making your home pest-free can take up to six weeks, Londry says.


To hear the full story, click the audio labelled: How to keep rats out of your home.

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