British Columbia·City Votes 2014

Metro Vancouver and Fraser Valley civic election information

The campaigns are underway and voters across Metro Vancouver, the Fraser Valley and the rest of B.C. will be heading to the polls on Nov. 15 to elect their new mayors, councillors, school trustees, and park commissioners.

Your guide to the Nov. 15 municipal elections in Metro Vancouver and the Fraser Valley

Click on the map for more information about civic elections in each area. (CBC)

The campaigns are underway and voters across Metro Vancouver, the Fraser Valley and the rest of B.C. will be heading to the polls on Nov. 15  to elect their new mayors, councillors, school trustees, and in some cases park commissioners.

Most polls are open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. on general voting day, Nov. 15.

But each local municipality is responsible for running its own civic election, including poll locations and hours, running advanced polls and creating voters lists. So be sure to double-check times and locations in your area, starting with our list below.

Lower Mainland candidates and information

Who can vote?

You are eligible to vote in a local election when you:

  • Are a Canadian citizen.
  • Are 18 years of age or older when you register to vote or will be 18 years of age or older on general voting day.
  • Have been a resident of British Columbia for at least six months before you register to vote.
  • Are not disqualified under the Local Government Act, or any other enactment, or by law from voting in a local election.
  • Have lived in the jurisdiction where you intend to vote for at least 30 days before you register to vote, or,
  • Are the registered owner of property in the jurisdiction where you intend to vote for at least 30 days before you register to vote.

Identification and voters lists

Many municipalities use the provincial voters list, but some do not, so check the links below for more information on how to ensure you are registered to vote.

  • Identification is not required when a jurisdiction uses a list of registered electors (voters list) and your name is on the list.
  • You will be required to provide identification if your name is not on the list of registered electors, or when the jurisdiction does not use a voter’s list. You must provide two pieces of identification that prove who you are and where you live – or take a solemn declaration about where you live – when identification is required by a jurisdiction and you are eligible to vote as a resident elector. One piece of identification must include your signature.
  • You must provide two pieces of identification that prove who you are and where you live as well as the address or legal description and the title (or other proof of ownership) of the property you own when identification is required by a jurisdiction and you are eligible to vote as a non-resident property elector. Only one owner can vote – and they must have the written consent of the majority of the other owners – when you own a property with one or more person(s).

Download the 2014 Voter's Guide in English, Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional),FarsiFrench, Korean or Punjabi.

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