British Columbia

Majority of Canadians and Americans agree on climate change issues, poll suggests

The majority of Canadians and Americans agree that climate change is real, a major crisis and more needs to be done to combat its effects, suggests a new poll.

More than half of Canadians and Americans surveyed would pay higher taxes to combat climate change

A protester marches during a climate strike in Toronto last September. (Craig Chivers/CBC)

The majority of Canadians and Americans agree that climate change is real, a major crisis and more needs to be done to combat its effects, suggests a new poll

In a survey of 1,000 adults from both sides of the border a majority of Canadians (64 per cent) and Americans (53 per cent) believe that global warming, or climate change, "is a fact and is mostly caused by emissions from vehicles and industrial facilities." 

About one-quarter of respondents from both countries said it "is a fact and mostly caused by natural changes."

Only 7 per cent of Canadians and 14 per cent of Americans said "global warming is a theory that has not yet been proven." 

Similarly, a majority of those polled feel climate change is a major crisis — 62 per cent of Canadians and 51 per cent of Americans — while 26 per cent on both sides agree it is a minor crisis, and a sliver of Canadians (7 per cent) and Americans (14 per cent) say it is not a crisis at all. 

About two-thirds of Canadians think governments, companies and individuals need to do more to deal with issues relating to climate change, while just over half of Americans feel their country should do more. 

And when it comes to paying to address those issues with higher taxes, about half of those surveyed would be willing to pay more to combat climate change, floods, forest fires, and fund improvements to transit, schools and housing.  

The study, conducted by Research Co., is based on an online survey of 1,000 adults from Canada and the U.S between June 1 and 3. A comparable margin of error for a probabilistic sample of this size would be plus or minus 3.1 per cent.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now