British Columbia

B.C. mayor camping, fasting by highway to raise money for village resource centre

If you find yourself on B.C.'s Highway 6 this weekend, keep your eyes peeled for the "Welcome to Lumby" sign as you approach the village. Next to it, you'll find the mayor, Kevin Acton, camping in a tent and fasting in a bid to raise money for a local resource centre.

Fourth annual fasting funderaiser for Lumby mayor Kevin Acton

Lumby, B.C. Mayor Kevin Acton will be camping and fasting by the highway this weekend to raise money for a local resource centre. (Whitevalley Community Resource Centre)

If you find yourself on B.C.'s Highway 6 this weekend, keep your eyes peeled for the "Welcome to Lumby" sign as you approach the village.

Next to it, you'll find the mayor, Kevin Acton, camping in a tent and fasting in a bid to raise money for the less fortunate residents of Lumby.

For the fourth year in a row, Acton is fundraising for the Whitevalley Community Resource Centre, a service he said is invaluable for Lumby residents who find themselves struggling financially.

"A lot of people are one or two paycheques away from going without," Acton told Daybreak South host Alya Ramadan.

"Pretty much anyone can experience a time in their life when they've had little or nothing to put in the cupboards."

Fourth year of fasting

Acton will camp by the "Welcome to Lumby" sign from 5 p.m. Friday until 5 p.m. Sunday, and will consume nothing but water during that time.

The annual event first started in 2013, when the Whitevalley Community Resource Centre was looking to establish a legacy fund to provide a more constant stream of funding than it was getting from the government. Acton thought it was a great cause and decided to get involved in his own unique way.

"The days go by so fast, because there are so many people that are interested and come by and talk and chat and provide support," Acton said.

Acton recalled a story from a man who fell ill, which resulted in him losing his job, his health insurance, and eventually his house. He went to the resource centre for its counselling and food bank services and is now back on his feet.

"It just really shows that we're not that far from getting knocked down off our chair," Acton said.

He's keen to talk local politics with anyone who stops by too.

"What a great place to have the mayor cornered and to tell me what you think," he said.

With files from CBC's Daybreak South.

now