British Columbia

Little Sisters wins right to be heard in top court

A high-profile gay and lesbian bookstore in Vancouver has won the latest round in its legal battle over the seizure of imported books by Canada Customs.

A high-profile gay and lesbian bookstore in Vancouver has won the latest round in its legal battle over the seizure of imported books by Canada Customs.



The Supreme Court of Canada has agreed to hear the application by Little Sisters Book and Art Emporium to have its legal costs paid by the federal government.

For more than 20 years, Customs officers have been seizing Little Sisters' books, magazines and videos coming across the border – claiming they promote harmful sexual practices.

That's led to a protracted, expensive fight by owner Jim Deva. And he went to court to recover his legal costs.

Last year, Deva won a ruling in B.C. Supreme Court granting him unspecified legal costs, but that decision was reversed this year by the B.C. Court of Appeal.

Deva then appealed that decision to the country's highest court, which has agreed to review the case. No date has been set for the hearing in Ottawa.

Deva says if the Supreme Court had decided not to hear the case, he would have been forced to give up his fight with Canada Customs, "because they have more money than we do."

with files from Canadian Press

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