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LGBTQ issues are human issues: here's why

Much more still needs to be done to accommodate the different standpoints of the LGBTQ community in different facets of everyday life, advocates say.

People carry overlapping identities, so examining each issue though their standpoints is crucial

A series of people are visible beneath a large rainbow flag, which takes up the majority of the image.
Much more still needs to be done to accommodate the different standpoints and needs of the LGBTQ community in different facets of everyday life, advocates say. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)

Matters that impact LGBTQ people, like access to hormone therapy and safe gender-affirming surgeries, are often seen as unique. 

But LGBTQ people also interact with areas of everyday society, such as education and health care, where their identities can affect their experiences.

Much more still needs to be done to accommodate the different standpoints and needs of the LGBTQ community in different facets of everyday life, advocates say.

To delve into this idea deeper, CBC's The Early Edition in Vancouver heard from some members of the LGBTQ community during July, ahead of Vancouver Pride. 

These are a few of their stories. 

Erasing the not so invisible divide

CBC's Kiran Singh and Xtra Magazine's Mel Woods join Stephen Quinn, host of CBC's The Early Edition, to talk about the importance of examining social issues through the experiences of LGBTQ people.

Throughout this week, we will bring you very human stories of LGBTQ+ individuals in a series we are calling - We Are Here. Our own Kiran Singh and Xtra magazine's Mel Woods join us for a look ahead at the series.
Mel Woods looks at the camera. They are wearing round glasses.
Looking through an LGBTQ lens at issues that affect wider society is becoming more important as divisiveness increases around the world, Mel Woods says. (Submitted by Mel Woods)

Diverse families in the school system

Serene Carter and Stevie Nguyen tell CBC's Kiran Singh about raising their 10-year-old Noah in a diverse family setting.

Kiran Singh speaks with Serene Carter and Stevie Nguyen about raising a child who has four parents in total, when two of them happen to be queer.
A person holds up a picture with Serene, Stevie, and Noah smiling together.
Serene Carter says her son Noah is never given the time or resources at school to talk about his two homes and his three moms. (Kiran Singh/CBC)

Accommodating all abilities and identities

Heather McCain sits down with CBC's Kiran Singh to explore the complexities intersecting identities can present when you are disabled, trans and asexual. 

Kiran Singh brings us the third installment in our series that continues the conversation of inclusion in the LGBTQ community.
Heather McCain looks at the camera. They have a shaved head, and are wearing a shirt that reads 'They Them'.
Heather McCain found there was no support for them as a neurodivergent trans person, so they had to tackle their neurodivergence before they could explore their identity. (Kiran Singh/CBC)

Losing a partner

The Early Edition host Stephen Quinn speaks to Tori Phillips and Lynda Dickson, now engaged to be wed, about the deaths of their respective former partners and how they found each other.

We continue to share LGBTQ+ humans stories through our week-long series #WeAreHere. In today's installment, we talk with a couple that experienced the worst of our healthcare, and being queer added another layer of complexities to the ordeal.
Tori and Lynda look at each other, standing on a suburban street.
Tori Phillips (left) and Lynda Dickson both lost their partners, but have since found new love with each other. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

Activism is inclusive

Ellen Woodsworth and Joy Masuhara can be considered a power couple when it comes to advocating for marginalized communities. CBC's Stephen Quinn sits down with them to explore the idea of intersectionality in activism. 

We continue celebrating LGBTQ+ humans with our week-long series #WeAreHere. In today's installment, we talk with Ellen Woodsworth, and Joy Masuhara. A couple that has been fighting for Women and LGBTQ rights for decades.
Two people sit on a green park bench.
Race, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity and who holds the balance of power in society all factor into activism, says Joy Masuhara (right). (Ben Nelms/CBC)

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kiran Singh is CBC's Surrey pop-up reporter and a story producer with The Early Edition at CBC Radio Vancouver. Reach him at kiran.singh@cbc.ca or @vancitysingh.

With files from The Early Edition

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