British Columbia

Last Door Recovery Society marks 25 years of helping youth with addiction

The society, based in New Westminster, is marking the 25th anniversary of its youth drug and alcohol treatment program, which is open to males between the ages of 14 and 18.

Program is open to males between the ages of 14 and 18

Last Door Recovery Society is celebrating the 25th anniversary of its youth drug and alcohol treatment program. (Last Door Recovery Society)

Last Door Recovery Society in New Westminster is marking the 25th anniversary of its youth drug and alcohol treatment program, which is open to males between the ages of 14 and 18. 

The society says it has helped more than 600 people since the youth program began. 

Peter Beka, 50, found success in the society's adult program when he was 19 and now works at the facility as a program manager. 

"I'm just one of them people who didn't have an off switch," said Beka.

He said his drug use began as a curiosity, but it soon included harder drugs and progressed until he was addicted and needed help. 

"I just had this real debt of gratitude for the impact Last Door had on my family and my own personal life," said Beka.

He credits a community approach in helping clients deal with their root issues. He said young people stay at the facility from three months to a year.

Beka said the program is holistic so it better supports young people who may be dealing with self-esteem issues.

Last Door offers group therapy, counselling, a balanced diet, recreation and socialization and post-treatment help with access to educational opportunities.

Peter Beka, 50, is a program manager at Last Door Recovery Society. He went through a treatment program at Last Door when he was 19. (Last Door Recovery Society)

Beka pointed out one of the biggest differences in treatment services at the facility over the years has been the recognition of the role of mental health in addiction.

"I think there is a stronger relationship between mental health services and addiction services in supporting individuals who are struggling with concurrent disorders."

Beka said seeing teens overcome significant obstacles in their lives has been his biggest reward.

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