British Columbia

It wasn't the rainiest November — but it was Vancouver's warmest

Although it may have seemed like it, it wasn't quite the all-time wettest November for Vancouver ... but it was the warmest!

You may have complained about the rain, but it was actually the temperatures that were most impressive

Even this guy is breaking out the anti-rain gear as we round out another soggy month. (Johanna Wagstaffe/CBC)

It's probably no surprise to hear that this November was a wet one for Vancouver. Actually that would be an understatement. 

But this might be surprising to hear — it was actually the warmest November ever on record for the city.

The old record to beat for November was 8.9 C set in 1939. This year, in the first 29 days, Vancouver had an average temperature of 9.5 C.

A chillier final November day knocked our monthly average down slightly — but 2016's November was the warmest on record.

4th place for rainy days

Vancouver recorded 25 days of rainfall in November. There were three more days that recorded trace amounts at the station, but those don't count towards the official record.

That puts this year in fourth place in terms of the number of days it rained in November.

On average, November usually brings about 20 days of rain to Vancouver, as it is one of our wettest months.

As far as how much rain fell, the city saw 237 millimetres. That's well above the November average of 190 millimetres, but not record-breaking.

Changes in the weather pattern for December

Many of the systems in November brought the wet weather in via atmospheric rivers that transported both moisture and warm air from subtropical regions. That's part of the reason it was both wet and mild last month.

But the first arctic outbreak of the season has its eyes on the province for early next week. Stay tuned for our first chance of snow here in Vancouver. 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Johanna Wagstaffe

Senior Meteorologist

Johanna Wagstaffe is a senior meteorologist for CBC, covering weather and science stories, with a background in seismology and earth science. Her weekly segment, Science Smart, answers viewers' science-related questions.

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