British Columbia

Huawei's Meng Wanzhou appears in Vancouver court for bail adjustment hearing

A day after the U.S. Department of Justice announced a formal request for her extradition, the chief financial officer of telecommunications giant Huawei appeared in B.C. Supreme Court for a bail adjustment hearing.

A day after U.S. requests her extradition to face 13 criminal charges, Meng appears in B.C. Supreme Court

Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou leaves her home to attend a court appearance regarding her bail conditions. (Darryl Dyck/Canadian Press)

A day after the U.S. Department of Justice announced a formal request for her extradition, the chief financial officer of telecommunications giant Huawei appeared in B.C. Supreme Court for a bail adjustment hearing.

Meng Wanzhou has been living under strict bail conditions in her Vancouver home since her release last December.

Meng asked the court to update details around a person acting as part of the $7 million surety she had to post as a condition of her release last month.

Robert Williams of the Paul Tsai China Center at Yale Law School shares analysis on Power & Politics

Robert Williams of the Paul Tsai China Center at Yale Law School, shares insights into the case. 7:25

More specifically, she asked that Robert Cheng be reinstated as a surety guarantor. Cheng had originally pledged his $1.8 million dollar home but never signed the documents to follow through due to a drop in value of his home. Another person stepped up with cash but Cheng and his wife have now put forward cash and the home to make up the difference in the value.

Tuesday's appearance comes a day after a dramatic announcement by U.S. Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker of 13 criminal charges against Meng, Huawei, and its affiliates in the U.S. and Hong Kong.

The charges date back to 2009 on allegations concerning the relationship between Huawei and a company called Skycom that did business in Iran. 

U.S. prosecutors claim Skycom was a hidden subsidiary of Huawei and accuse Meng, 46, of misrepresenting the relationship in order to induce U.S. banks to move money in violation of sanctions against Iran.

Canada's justice minister has until March 1 to respond to the extradition request.

In the wake of Meng's arrest, Canada and China appear to have engaged in a growing diplomatic feud that has seen China arrest two Canadians and sentence a third to death for his role in an alleged drug conspiracy.

Meng and her husband own two homes in Vancouver, but she was arrested at the international airport in the B.C. city while in transit to Mexico and South America. Prosecutors claim she and other Huawei executives have been avoiding the U.S. since learning of an investigation into their activities.

In proceedings that drew an overflow crowd of international observers, a B.C. Supreme Court judge granted Meng bail in spite of arguments from prosecutors that she would be a flight risk.

Camera crews stake out the home of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. One day after the U.S. issued a formal extradition request, Meng is scheduled to appear in B.C. Supreme Court to request a bail adjustment. (Yvette Brend/CBC)

Meng is living under 24-hour supervision for which she has to pick up the tab. Five friends with permanent ties to Canada also stepped forward to act as guarantors.

The terms of Meng's bail limit her movements to the Lower Mainland.

Her next scheduled court appearance has been moved to March 6. 

Watch the Power Panel discuss the latest developments on CBC News Network's Power & Politics

David, Tiffany, Stockwell and Marcella discuss the deteriorating Canada-China relationship. 15:25