British Columbia

'He lived for soccer': Dylan Buckle murdered in Lund

Dylan Buckle's mother shares thoughts about her 21-year-old son who was one of two young men murdered in Lund, B.C. on June 17, 2017.

21-year-old was a volunteer firefighter and wanted to join the Canadian navy, says mother Terry Buckle

Dylan Buckle lived in London, England until he returned to B.C. at Christmas. (Terry Buckle)

21-year-old Dylan Buckle had a plan. 

Over the summer, he would work as a caretaker at a property in Powell River, B.C., visit with friends and do some boating.

He had moved to the Sunshine Coast community about a month ago. 

In the fall, Dylan hoped to focus on choosing a career. 

"He had applied to become a firefighter but he tore his ACL while playing soccer, so he had to wait," said his mother Terry Buckle, who lives in Chilliwack, B.C.

​"He'd also decided that he would interview to join the Canadian navy and he had just finished that process." 

All of that changed in the early morning hours of June 17, 2017, when Buckle and his best-friend Braxton Leask, 20, were the victims of a double shooting at a residence in the small village of Lund, B.C.  

"It's just so sad that these two boys have been taken from us," said Buckle. 

A third man, who is not a suspect, was also shot at the house but is recovering from non-life threatening injuries. 

The trial has not yet started and no clear motive has yet been provided for what happened.

World traveller 

Dylan Buckle (left) and Braxton Leask on an Alaskan cruise. (Terry Buckle)

Dylan loved to see the world, according to his mother. 

He'd been to France, Italy and Spain. 

Last Christmas, he returned to B.C. after a year-and-a-half of living in London, England. 

"He was working at a sporting goods store there and just taking the time to see the world," said Buckle. 

"Braxton had gone to London to visit him before he came home." 

Inseparable friends 

The two young men graduated together from Brooks Secondary School, in Powell River in 2014 and played soccer with Powell River Villa

As teens they both worked at the local gas station. 

"I've had people say, I knew them through the gas station, and they were always smiling and happy.

"And I loved to go get my gas there because the boys always pumped the gas and made good conversation," said Buckle. 

Dylan Buckle with his sister Emily at his graduation from Brooks Secondary School in 2014. (Terry Buckle)

The two were also avid soccer fans. 

"They had gone to Spain because they loved Barcelona, the soccer team," said Buckle. 

"So, they had made a trip to Spain just to go to a Barcelona game. 

The "boys" were inseparable.

"If you saw Braxton, you saw Dylan. If you saw Dylan, you saw Braxton," said Buckle. 

The bond Dylan and Leask shared was well known among their other friends.

"It's been incredible. Every single one of them has reached out to me and told us how much they love us," said Buckle. 

"They're the ones who have gone into this house, this murder scene, and they've packed up all of the boys' stuff. 

"And they've gotten it out of there, so no one in the family has to go there." 

Accused in court 

19-year-old Jason Timothy Foulds of Powell River is scheduled to appear in court on Tuesday. 

He's charged with two counts of first-degree murder and one count of attempted murder. 

Buckle says her family will not be in the courtroom. 

A joint memorial service is being planned for Dylan and Leask on July 8, 2017 in Powell River.

"We're expecting over 700 people to show up," said Buckle. 

"I really want everyone to see who these boys were — a celebration of life of two boys who were loved not just by their small group of friends but an entire community."  

Braxton Leask (second right) with Dylan Buckle and his sisters on a Buckle family cruise to Mexico.

About the Author

Belle Puri

Reporter

Belle Puri is a veteran journalist who has won awards for her reporting in a variety of fields. Belle contributes to CBC Vancouver's Impact Team, where she investigates and reports on stories that impact people in their local community.

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