British Columbia

Blind B.C. man loses discrimination case against taxi company

A blind Victoria man has lost his discrimination complaint in British Columbia's highest court.

Graeme McCreath and his guide dog were denied a cab ride because of the driver's allergies

Graeme McCreath claimed Victoria Taxi discriminated against him and his guide dog. (CBC)

A blind Victoria man has lost his discrimination complaint in British Columbia's highest court.

In a unanimous ruling, a panel of the B.C. Court of Appeal found that the discrimination against Graeme McCreath and his guide dog, Adrienne, was justified in a denial of service in July 2014.

McCreath claimed systemic discrimination when a driver with Victoria Taxi said he could not allow dogs in his car because of his allergies.

The driver refused to transport McCreath and his dog, but arranged for another taxi that arrived within minutes.

Both the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal and the B.C. Supreme Court rejected the man's complaint, finding the taxi company had demonstrated there was a valid and reasonable justification for the discrimination.

McCreath took the matter to the Court of Appeal, but it has now dismissed the case, ruling the taxi company is also required to meet the special needs of its own drivers.

Corrections

  • A previous version of this story incorrectly reported that the B.C. Court of Appeal said a blind man with a guide dog had not been discriminated against when he was refused a taxi ride in July 2014. In fact, the court said there was discrimination against Graeme McCreath of Victoria, but it was justified because the taxi driver was allergic to dogs.
    Dec 13, 2017 6:51 PM PT