British Columbia·New

Greyhound and the Highway of Tears: a timeline of the company's decision to leave northern B.C.

Company says improved public transit options hastened the decline of profitability in northern B.C.

Company says improved public transit options hastened decline of profitability in northern B.C.

A public transit bus on B.C.'s Highway 16, known as the Highway of Tears. (CBC)

The B.C. Passenger Transportation Board has given Greyhound Canada permission to stop serving northern British Columbia and Vancouver Island, as well as certain routes in southern B.C. and its final remaining routes in Yukon.

The company initially made the application on Aug. 10, 2017, prompting widespread discussion about safe, affordable transportation options in northern B.C., an area that includes Highway 16, dubbed the Highway of Tears because many women have vanished from the roadway that links Prince George to Prince Rupert, B.C.

​The company blamed declining ridership, predicated in part by the addition of B.C. Transit routes between some communities in northwest B.C.

Here is a timeline of those developments:

To hear more on this story, click on the audio titled 'Greyhound cutting bus routes.'

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Andrew Kurjata

CBC Prince George | @akurjata

Andrew Kurjata is an award-winning journalist covering Northern British Columbia for CBC Radio and cbc.ca, situated in unceded Lheidli T'enneh territory in Prince George. You can email him at andrew.kurjata@cbc.ca. You can also send encrypted messages using Signal to 250.552.2058.

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