British Columbia

Golden Ears Park reopens after habituated black bear killed

Golden Ears Provincial Park in Maple Ridge, B.C., reopened on Wednesday after conservation officers killed a problem black bear that had become habituated to human food. Another bear has also been killed after it attacked a woman in Pemberton.

Another bear also killed Tuesday in Pemberton after attacking woman

B.C. Parks is closing Golden Ears Park to the public due to a habituated black bear in the area. (Ben Nelms/CBC)

Golden Ears Provincial Park in Maple Ridge, B.C., reopened on Wednesday after conservation officers killed a problem black bear that had become habituated to human food.

B.C. Parks said the bear had been getting into numerous vehicles throughout the park to find food. In one instance, it said the bear walked through an open trailer door while people were still inside.

The entire park was shut down on Tuesday morning while conservation officers tried to trap the bear. 

B.C. Parks said Gold Creek Campground was closed last week so the B.C. Conservation Officer Service (BCCOS) to attempt to trap the bear.

The BCCOS and B.C. Parks said they cannot stress enough the importance of securing food which they say is the single best way to keep the public and bears safe.

On Tuesday, another black bear was killed in Pemberton after it attacked a woman who had an off-leash dog, according to the BCCOS.

The attack happened at the popular Riverside Wetlands trail, which was closed as conservation officers secured and killed the bear.

The service said the same bear was responsible for a similar attack on Sunday and had also charged at people before.

"Due to the risk to public safety, the bear was not a candidate for rehabilitation or relocation," the BCCOS said in a statement.

Two young bears were located close to the attack site, according to officers, but they were left alone on the advice of wildlife biologists.

The statement said dogs should not be left off-leash in bear country. Hikers should carry bear spray when walking along trails, it added.

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