British Columbia

Gluten-free is 'nonsense' says Wheat Belly author

Going gluten-free isn't good enough, according to William Davis, author of Wheat Belly. Davis sat down with The Early Edition to explain why he thinks dropping wheat from your diet is the way to lose weight and stay healthy.

William Davis speaks at the Vancouver Convention Centre tonight

Wheat Belly author William Davis argues people should drop wheat from their diets. (Wheat Belly Blog)

Going gluten-free isn't good enough, according to William Davis, author of the bestselling Wheat Belly book. 

Davis sat down with The Early Edition to explain why he thinks dropping wheat from your diet is the way to lose weight and stay healthy. 

"I'm happy that people are listening, but I'm saddened that they are being tricked by this gluten free nonsense," said Davis.

Author William Davis speaks to Early Edition host Rick Cluff about his book Wheat Belly. (CBC)

The author and cardiologist says gluten-free diets have tricked people into replacing one problem with another. He says a lot of gluten-free foods are made with "junk carbohydrate ingredients" — corn flour, rice flour, potato starch and corn starch — which he says raise blood sugar and are contributing factors to hypertension, cataracts, heart disease and cancer. 

Davis's book is not without controversy — the Health Grains Institute has written a rebuttal, and the Canadian Diabetes Association, the Heart and Stroke Foundation, and Canada's Food Guide all continue to recommend whole grains as part of a healthy diet.  

He speaks at 7 p.m. PT at the Vancouver Convention Centre as part of The MidLife Affair.

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