British Columbia

Gabriola bridge: contract awarded to U.S. company to study proposal

A $200,000 contract has been awarded to a Colorado-based company to study the feasibility of linking Gabriola Island and Vancouver Island by bridge.

Study will not look at public support for replacing ferry service with bridge

The BC Ferries vessel Quinsam, which was built in 1982 to carry 70 cars, currently provides service between Nanaimo and Gabriola Island. (BC Ferries)

A $200,000 contract has been awarded to a Colorado-based company to study the feasibility of linking Gabriola Island and Vancouver Island by bridge.

CH2M Hill Canada Ltd., which has offices across Canada but is based in Englewood, Colo., will study potential bridge locations, cost estimates and compare a fixed link with existing ferry service.

A Ministry of Transportation statement says the company will not assess the level of public support for a fixed link with the island located east of Nanaimo.

The study was announced in September by Transportation Minister Todd Stone after hundreds of locals who were tired of ferry fare increases and service cuts petitioned the government.

Stone says the study will give residents the necessary information to have an informed debate about a bridge and how it compares to the existing ferry service.

About 4,000 full-time residents live on Gabriola Island, which is serviced by a ferry that the B.C. government says carried 341,000 vehicles in 2013-14.

Google Maps: Gabriola Island

 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.