British Columbia

Pilot's decision to fly to B.C. camp in poor weather led to crash that killed 4, investigation finds

A decision to continue flying in poor weather to a remote B.C. fishing lodge in July 2019 led to a floatplane crash that killed four people and injured five others, according to the Transportation Safety Board.

4 people, including pilot, died when plane crashed into Addenbroke Island in 2019

A photo of the crash site on Addenbroke Island taken on July 26, 2019. Four people died and five others were injured when the Seair Seaplanes Cessna 208 went down around 11 a.m. PT. (442 Transport and Rescue Squadron/Canadian Armed Forces)

A decision to continue flying in poor weather to a remote B.C. fishing lodge in July 2019 led to a floatplane crash that killed four people and injured five others, according to the Transportation Safety Board.

The TSB said the plane left Vancouver airport's water aerodrome on July 26, 2019, for Calvert Island on B.C.'s central coast, despite poor weather forecasts for the area.

The investigation report said the pilot continued flying in bad weather and reduced visibility. He was not able to determine the Cessna 208 Caravan's proximity to rising terrain, crashing into a hillside on Addenbroke Island, about 17 kilometres from the fishing lodge.

The charter plane was operated by Seair Seaplanes.

The TSB said the floatplane was equipped with flight data monitoring equipment but was not required by regulation to establish a flight data monitoring program.

The board said air operators with flight data monitoring equipment that do not actively monitor their flight operations may drift toward unsafe practices that increase the risk to flight crew and passengers.

The pilot died in the crash and the three male passengers who were killed were from South Carolina, Washington state and Germany.

The TSB said four passengers were seriously injured and one received minor injuries.

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