British Columbia

2 billion doses of fentanyl prevented from hitting the streets, Canada border agents say after seizure

The Canada Border Services Agency says its marine operations team has seized a large amount of a chemical used in the production of fentanyl, effectively preventing billions of doses of the potentially deadly drug from hitting the streets.

1,500 kg of controlled substance 4-Piperidone seized in routine marine container sweep at port in July

The Canada Border Services Agency has released images of barrels of a precursor chemical called 4-Piperidone used in the production of fentanyl seized by agents in Metro Vancouver on July 16. (Canadian Border Services Agency)

The Canada Border Services Agency says its marine operations team has seized a large amount of a chemical used in the production of fentanyl, effectively preventing billions of doses of the potentially deadly drug from hitting the streets.

In a statement Thursday, the CBSA said that during a routine examination of a marine container July 16, border agents found approximately 1,500 kilograms of 4-Piperidone among the household items inside the container.

The CBSA said the seizure has prevented a significant amount of dangerous chemicals from getting into the hands of illegal dealers who produce poisonous drugs to sell on the streets. 

"The work of our border services officers cannot be understated," said the director of the CBSA's Metro Vancouver district, Joseph Chayeski. 

A look inside one of the barrels seized by border agents July 16, showing the raw substance called 4-Piperidone that might have otherwise been used to produce billions of doses of the potentially deadly drug fentanyl. (Canadian Border Services Agency)

"This seizure is a great example of how their vigilance, commitment, and dedicated efforts have a real impact on the health and well-being of Canadians and the safety of our communities."

4-Piperidone is a precursor chemical used in the production of fentanyl and is considered a class A controlled substance under Canada's Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, according to the CBSA.

The CBSA estimates the 1,500 kilograms could have been used to produce over two billion doses of fentanyl.

Anyone with information about suspicious cross-border activity is asked to contact the CBSA Border Watch Toll-Free Line at 1-888-502-9060. 

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