British Columbia

Families scoop up abandoned U.S. dogs at adoption event in Langley

Organizers say stray dogs in the U.S. is a big problem often solved with euthanasia.

Organizers say strays in U.S. a big problem often solved with euthanasia

Taylor, a dog rescued from a shelter in the U.S. stayed with a foster family in B.C. before being formally adopted at a special event in Langley on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019. (Jon Hernandez/CBC)

Dozens of dogs rescued from certain death in the U.S were happily adopted by people at a special event in Langley on Saturday.

The mass adoption was organized by Embrace a Discarded Animal Society at the Langley Petsmart, just one of almost a dozen held throughout the year, as demand for the animals is so high.

A dog, rescued from a shelter in the U.S. sits in its cage as it waits to be adopted in Langley on Jan. 12, 2019. (Jon Hernandez/CBC)

The president of the society, Leslie Fee, says there are many animals that have been abandoned in the U.S., which will most likely be euthanized.

"People move away and they just drop their dog off at the shelter, there's so many strays in California and Texas and different places," she said. "We just don't see that in Canada."

A dog rescued from a shelter in the U.S. sits in its cage as it waits to be adopted in Langley on Jan. 12, 2019. (Jon Hernandez/CBC)

In the past several years, other groups have also hosted adoptions in B.C. for dogs rescued from the U.S.

Saturday's event was the the biggest adoption rally the Langley Petsmart has ever hosted. There were 70 dogs but not everyone who showed up at the event was able to get one due to demand.

"They make, wonderful, wonderful pets," said Fee.

Boots, a Chihuahua cross rescued from a shelter in the U.S. was adopted by a couple in Langley B.C. on Saturday Jan. 12, 2019. (Jon Hernandez/CBC)

People like Paul and Colleen Siemens did adopt. They brought home a Chihuahua named Boots, who licked Paul's hand when he raised it to the cage where the animal was sitting.

"It [was] a good sign," said Colleen.

Paul Siemens says it's hard to resist the animals, considering their outlook in the U.S.

"I have this affinity for little tiny dogs like this, and this one is fitting the bill," he said.

Paul and Colleen Siemens spent time with their new dog Boots. (Jon Hernandez/CBC)

All the pets have all been spayed or neutered and even had some basic training. Volunteers ensure that the animals find safe and stable homes.

With files from Jon Hernandez.