British Columbia

Vancouver residents get first peek at the future of False Creek Flats

City staff will sort through the feedback from the open house and make any changes to the plan, before presenting it to council later this year.

The draft plan from the City of Vancouver hopes to increase jobs in the area over the next 30 years

A rendering of the proposed redevelopment of St. Paul's Hospital at Vancouver's False Creek Flats. The new hospital will be built on the grounds of the Jim Pattison Medical Centre. (Providence Health Care)

Vancouver residents are getting a clearer picture of what the future False Creek Flats area may look like. 

The city released a draft plan for the 450-acre industrial neighbourhood at an open house Wednesday night.

The False Creek Flats area, which is bounded by Prior Street, Clark Drive, Great Northern Way and Main Street is home to more than 600 businesses ranging from manufacturing, transportation, textiles, food and beverage production, to art galleries.

The goal is to increase the number of jobs in the area from 8,000 to 30,000 over the next 30 years. Many of them will be at the new St. Paul's hospital and the Emily Carr University campus.

On Wednesday night, residents got a first look at what the future of the False Creek Flats may look like. (CBC)

"It's one of our last large employment areas in the city," said Karen Hoese, assistant director of planning for the downtown division with the city. 

"Right now the plan is about economic revitalization … but it's also about creating an area that supports those jobs."

The False Creek Flats area is bounded by Prior Street, Clark Drive, Great Northern Way and Main Street. (CBC)

There are also a number of new community gardens and bike paths proposed.

"Right now it's a very flat neighbourhood.... There's nothing that draws people into this neighbourhood. It's mostly industrial," said Ariela Friedmann, a resident who was at the open house.

"I think it's very exciting for Vancouver to make this a community that will draw people in."

City staff will sort through all the feedback from the open house and make any changes to the plan if needed. It will then be presented to council later this year.

The area is home to more than 600 businesses ranging from manufacturing, transportation, textiles, food and beverage production, to art galleries. (Margaret Gallagher/CBC)

With files from Brenna Rose and Margaret Gallagher

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