British Columbia

B.C. environmentalist killed in Ethiopian Airline crash honoured with new award

The life of a young B.C. environmentalist killed on the Boeing 737 Max 8 plane that crashed in Ethiopia earlier this year is being honoured with a new award.

Micah Messent was chosen to represent Canada at the United Nations Environment Assembly in Kenya

Micah Messent in a 2018 Facebook photo. Messent was en route to a UN conference in Kenya went the plane he was on when down in Ethiopia, Mar. 10, 2019, killing 157 people on board. (Micah Messent/Facebook)

The life of a young B.C. environmentalist killed on the Boeing 737 Max 8 plane that crashed in Ethiopia earlier this year is being honoured with a new award.

The Micah Messent Young Professional Award of Excellence will recognize a young Canadian parks employee, intern, contractor or volunteer demonstrating leadership and passionate commitment to environmental stewardship and conservation, according to a B.C. government statement issued Monday.

"Micah was proud to come from a family with a rich history of working and spending time in national parks and taking care of our natural environment," said Micah's family in a written statement.

Messent, a young environmentalist and B.C. Parks employee who devoted his career to protecting the world's oceans and sharing Indigenous teachings, was one of 18 Canadians killed in the crash on Mar. 10, 2019.

Like many others on the plane, Messent was on his way to meet other young leaders for the United Nations Environment Assembly, held this week in Kenya. He'd been chosen to go to the conference as a Canadian representative.

Messent had posted the news of his trip as a "surprise" in his last Instagram post, a day before the crash.

BC Parks says it is creating an endowment of $20,000 that will be used to fund the award annually through the Park Enhancement Fund. 

Recipients must be between the ages of 18 and 30 years old and demonstrate action that has helped to engage and connect people with nature.

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