Muslim families open their homes and dinner tables to share Eid al-Adha celebrations with non-Muslims

The Islamic festival of Eid al-Adha begins on Tuesday and, across the country, Muslim families are opening their homes and dinner tables to share their annual celebration.

‘[It’s a way] to share with us this very special day of festivities and special day of meals’

Eid al-Adha celebrations run until Sunday, Aug. 25. (Amr Alfiky/Reuters)

The Islamic festival of Eid al-Adha begins on Tuesday and, across the country, Muslim families are opening their homes and dinner tables to share the annual celebration.  

More than one billion Muslims around the globe mark the holy holiday that honours charity and generosity.

A new national campaign called "Eid With A Muslim Friend" is inviting anyone who wants to participate to join a Muslim family and participate in the Eid feast. British Columbians can sign up online to be linked with a Muslim family. 

"It's a very exciting time of the year for us," said Safwan Choudhry, one of the campaign's organizers.

"Simply put, it can be equated to Christmas in its significance on the annual calendar."

Special day of feasts 

During Eid al-Adha , Muslims commemorate Prophet Abraham's sacrifice by slaughtering an animal such as a sheep, cow or goat. The meat is then given away to friends, family and those in need.

"It's recognizing how fortunate we are and also recognizing the various different sacrifices that have been made for us to be here," Choudhry told Matthew Lazin-Ryder, the guest host of CBC's On the Coast.

"Because it's so special for us, we wanted to do something where we could also share it."

"Eid With A Muslim Friend" is partially about teaching non-Muslims about their faith, Choudhry said, but also sharing one of the religion's most important celebrations.

"[It's a way] to give our fellow Canadians an opportunity to learn about Islam but also to share with us this very special day of festivities and special day of meals, the sights and sounds," he said.

Eid al-Adha celebrations run until Sunday, Aug. 25.   

The Islamic festival of Eid al-Adha begins on Tuesday and, across the country, Muslim families are opening their homes and dinner tables to share their annual celebration. 7:24

With files from On The Coast. 

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