British Columbia

Drought shaming alternative in Nanaimo rewards water savers

Rather than point the finger people who are wasting water, the local and regional governments are encouraging residents to nominate their neighbours as "water champions" in a new contest.

Win a gift card and a rubber ducky trophy for being a 'water champion'

Rather than drought shame your neighbours, the city of Nanaimo and the regional district want you to reognize water savers by nominating a "water champion." (Getty Images)

Don't be a drought shamer; be a water champion, say the City of Nanaimo and the Regional District of Nanaimo.

Rather than point the finger people who are wasting water on their lawns or decks, the local and regional governments are encouraging residents to nominate their neighbours as "water champions" in a new contest

Weekly water saver contest

"Seeing the drought that's struck our area during this summer, we wanted a way that would be fun, and lively, and actually have a positive reinforcement aspect to promote people taking action to save water this summer," said Julie Pisani, a program coordinator with the Regional District of Nanaimo.

Nanaimo is asking neighbours to nominate each other for their water saving techniques that include basic changes, such as incorporating native plants and drought-tolerant species, "planting" a rock garden that doesn't need irrigation, using grey water, collecting rain water and mulching the soil.

In recognizing those who are going above and beyond to save water, Nanaimo hopes to encourage a cultural shift in communities, moving away from wasteful water use outdoors on lawns to more efficient ways of using water in our landscapes, Pisani said. 

Current water restrictions in Nanaimo

The Regional District of Nanaimo — excluding the city of Nanaimo — is currently under a level four water ban which prohibits all lawn watering. 

The City of Nanaimo itself has a separate water supply and is still under level two drought restrictions, meaning residents are allowed to water their lawns just twice a week. 


To hear the full interview with Julie Pisani, listen to the audio labelled: Be a water champion, not a drought shamer.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now