British Columbia

Delta senior with 'too many' distracted driving tickets prohibited from driving

Police say the 72-year-old had too many tickets and was served with a four-month driving prohibition.

Police say the tickets were issued for using an electronic device while driving

The 72-year-old man from Delta was stopped by Saanich police and given a four-month driving prohibition. (David Horemans/CBC)

A Delta senior has been prohibited from driving for the next four months because he had "too many" distracted driving tickets.

Saanich police say the 72-year-old was driving through the district when their radar picked up his licence. 

"When we stopped and talked to the driver it turned out that on his record there was a notice to serve a driving prohibition," said Sgt. Julie Fast. "And in speaking to the driver, he came out and acknowledged that it was actually due to repeated tickets for use of an electronic device while driving."

So how many is too many? Fast says the driver likely had about four tickets. A distracted driving fine costs $368 plus four points on the person's driving licence. 

"There's no shortage of drivers being stopped and issued tickets like this," Fast added, noting that despite a number of awareness campaigns, people continue to use their devices while behind the wheel. 

The man was given a temporary licence that expired at midnight the same day to allow him enough time to get home to park his car. 

If he were caught driving while being prohibited, Fast says his car would be impounded and would be issued further prohibitions.

When asked if his age was a surprise to officers, Fast said the problem is seen across the board. 

"Sometimes you may want to think that is just the young that are doing this and they haven't, they're just attached to their phones more than older people. Yet, I think it's across the board with age on this."

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