British Columbia

Deer gives birth to triplets on UNBC campus exactly one year after having twins in same spot

A deer who has given birth by the campus quad of the University of Northern British Columbia in Prince George three times already has returned a fourth time — this time to give birth to triplets.

Deer has returned to the safety of Prince George, B.C., campus four times to give birth

Sianne Vautour witnessed the birth of the triplets as the deer came to rest at a spot near a window. (Submitted by Sianne Vautour)

One deer, two deer, three deer, four?

A deer who has given birth by the campus quad of the University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) in Prince George three times already has returned a fourth time — and this time to give birth to triplets.

What's more, the deer returned to give birth exactly one year after her last delivery.

Sianne Vautour, an animal lab assistant at UNBC, witnessed the birth of the triplets.

"I was surprised — we actually watched her give birth this time because she was right in front of the window," she said.

"We thought she was done, and she started pushing again and we thought, no way."

WildSafeBC says that most deer give birth to twins. Triplets or a single fawn are rare. (Submitted by Sianne Vautour)

Vautour said campus security is aware of the deer, and tracks where she goes so that she's not disturbed.

According to WildSafeBC, deer usually give birth to twins. A single fawn or triplets are much more rare.

The deer will often disappear for hours at a time, leaving her fawns well disguised in the bushes. It's a common behaviour among mother deer, as their scent can attract predators.

Visits to campus also appear to be a family affair. The deer's twins have previously returned to UNBC campus and were identified by measuring their tracks to estimate their age. 

"I just love her, I just get excited waiting for her to come because she usually comes on June 10 every year. It's so weird that she keeps coming back. She's had eight babies here now."

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