British Columbia

Daylight time extension popular, says AG

Attorney General Wally Oppal says he's receiving a lot of public support for the proposal to change the dates for daylight time in B.C.

Attorney General Wally Oppal says he's receiving a lot of public support for the proposal to change the dates for daylight time in B.C.

The changes have been under consideration since the U.S. Congress voted to extend daylight time by a total of a month per year – three weeks earlier in the spring and a week later in the fall.

That change, set to take effect in 2007, would see daylight time start on the second weekend in March and "fall back" on the first weekend in November.

The U.S. believes the extension will trim energy costs by cutting the need for artificial light in the evenings

   


AP file photo / Daytona Beach
News-Journal )

Several other provinces have already said they're going to follow the U.S. lead.

Oppal appears to be leaning the same way, noting there are several advantages for B.C. adopting the same changes.

"The major advantage is that it would allow us to be in tune with Ontario, Alberta and Manitoba – and most of all, Washington state, with whom we do a lot of trade."

Oppal says no decision has been made yet, with the government still looking for more public feedback.

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