British Columbia

What you need to know about COVID-19 in B.C. on May 29, 2020

With four new cases announced Friday, B.C. has now had 2,562 confirmed cases of COVID-19, but less than a tenth of those are still active.

Health officials announce 4 new cases of COVID-19 and no new deaths

Murals on Government Street in Victoria honour health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Mike McArthur/CBC)

THE LATEST:

  • This week saw the lowest number of deaths and new cases since B.C. declared a public health emergency.
  • Only four new cases of COVID-19 were reported on Friday.
  • No new deaths in the last 24 hours.
  • Large cruise ships are now banned from Canadian ports until Oct. 31.
  • To date, 2,562 cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed in B.C.
  • 164 people have died of the illness.
  • 2,170 people have recovered.
  • There are currently 241 active cases of COVID-19.
  • As of Friday, 34 patients were in hospital with COVID-19, including six in intensive care.

With only 56 new cases in the last seven days, this week has seen the lowest number of deaths and new cases of COVID-19 since B.C. declared a public health emergency on March 18.

Provincial health officials announced only four new cases on Friday. No deaths were recorded in the last 24 hours.

There are still 228 active cases in B.C. Thirty-four people remain in hospital, six of them in intensive care.

A total of 2,562 people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the province and 164 people have died.

Cruise ship ban

The federal government has extended a ban on large cruise ships docking at any Canadian ports until at least Oct. 31. Transport Minister Marc Garneau said any ship with overnight accommodations carrying more than 100 people will be not be allowed to operate in Canadian waters.

In March, Ottawa initially banned cruise ships carrying more than 500 passengers until July 1. 

The extension is another blow to the tourism sectors in Metro Vancouver and Greater Victoria, which brought in around $840 million and $130 million, respectively, during recent cruise ship seasons.

Earlier this month, Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry said cruise ship passengers would not be permitted to disembark in B.C. even if the ships were allowed to dock at the province's ports.

Officials continue to be concerned about the impact of the pandemic on the elderly and care home residents, and specialized response teams have been sent in to deal with outbreaks at two facilities in the Fraser Health region.

On Thursday, Henry announced the outbreak of COVID-19 at Mission Institution — one of the largest outbreaks in B.C. — has been declared over. A total of 120 inmates and several correctional officers tested positive and one inmate died in the outbreak at the federal prison.

Provincial court updates

Earlier this week, the Provincial Court of B.C. announced the next phase of service resumption, with limited courtrooms set to open next month for in-person appearances dealing with priority matters that can't be handled remotely.

Friday, the court specified that traffic, ticket and bylaw appearances scheduled between March 18 and June 12 remain adjourned and will be rescheduled. Notices of new appearance dates will be sent to disputants by mail.

Disputants will have the option to file a written request for a fine reduction or time to pay, or simply to pay the fine on the ticket. The deadline for payment has been extended to June 30. 

READ MORE: 

Top COVID-19 stories today

Important reminders:

Health officials widely agree the most important thing you can do to prevent coronavirus and other illnesses is to wash your hands regularly and avoid touching your face. 

The World Health Organization said more than 80 per cent of COVID-19 infections are estimated to be mild.

What's happening elsewhere in Canada

As of 10 p.m. PT on Thursday, Canada had 89,392 confirmed and presumptive coronavirus cases, with 47,471 considered resolved or recovered. A CBC News tally of deaths based on provincial health data, regional information and CBC's reporting stood at 7,046.

The numbers are not a complete picture, as they don't account for people who haven't been tested, those being investigated as a potential case and people still waiting for test results. 

For a look at what's happening across the country and the world, check the CBC interactive case tracker.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Common symptoms include:

  • Fever.
  • Cough.
  • Tiredness.

But more serious symptoms can develop, including difficulty breathing and pneumonia.

What should I do if I feel sick?

Stay home. Isolate yourself and call your local public health authority or 811. Do not visit an emergency room or urgent care centre to get tested.

Find information about COVID-19 from the B.C. Centre for Disease Control.

Non-medical information about COVID-19 is available in B.C. from 7:30 a.m.-8 p.m. PT, seven days a week at 1-888-COVID19 (1-888-268-4319).

What can I do to protect myself?

  • Wash your hands frequently and thoroughly. Keep them clean.
  • Keep at least two metres away from people who are sick.
  • When outside the home, keep two metres away from other people.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Masks won't fully protect you from infection, but can help prevent you from infecting others.

More detailed information on the outbreak is available on the federal government's website.

If you have a COVID-19-related story we should pursue that affects British Columbians, please email us at impact@cbc.ca

With files from The Canadian Press

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