British Columbia

You've got mail: Canada Post restarts delivery in area where Canuck the crow injured mail carrier

An East Vancouver resident and his neighbours are getting their mail back after Canada Post temporarily suspended delivery over several crow attacks.

'I was quite surprised," says Shawn Bergman who hasn't received mail for more than a month

Canada Post suspended delivery to three East Vancouver addresses for more than a month after Canuck the crow was reported to have repeatedly attacked and injured a mail carrier. (Jacy Schindel/CBC)

An East Vancouver resident and his neighbours are getting their mail back after Canada Post temporarily suspended delivery over several crow attacks.

Shawn Bergman said his landlord alerted him Tuesday to the mail delivery. 

"I was quite surprised," Bergman said. "I thought [Canada Post] would get in contact with me."

Canada Post suspended delivery to three addresses for more than a month after Canuck, a well-known neighbourhood crow, was reported to have repeatedly attacked and injured a mail carrier.

Bergman dubbed the crow Canuck after it befriended him about two years ago.

Since then, the bird has made headlines for a variety of antics including stealing evidence at an East Vancouver crime scene, getting its own Facebook page and being featured in an art exhibit.

BFFs forever? Canuck the Crow and Shawn Bergman on the day they met. (Facebook/thecrowandi)

The postal operator faced mounting criticism from fans of Canuck.

"We are monitoring the situation when delivering the mail to other residents on the street," Canada Post spokesperson Darcia Kmet said in a statement Wednesday.

"If our employees believe it is safe to deliver to those three addresses, they do so." 

Wayne Goodey, a lecturer in UBC's department of zoology and bird behaviour expert, called Canada Post's initial response "completely over-the-top."

A carrier could wear a wide-brimmed hat or carry an umbrella to foil a crow, Goodey said.

Nesting season — the period when crows are most likely to attack — typically runs from April to July.

Bergman plans to email Canada Post to thank them and find a solution, should Canuck go into nesting season in future years.

The crow did not attack the carrier during the latest delivery.

Instead, he's back to "doing normal crow stuff," Bergman said.

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