British Columbia

Historic North Vancouver cabin reborn as artist residency in False Creek

Built in 1927, the Blue Cabin was extensively renovated and over $1 million was raised to move it and turn it into a residency for three years. 

Inaugural program will focus on Coast Salish weaving practices

The historic Blue Cabin has been moved to False Creek to become an artist residency. (CBC)

A historic North Vancouver cabin that was destined for destruction has a new home in False Creek as an artist residency. 

Built in 1927, the Blue Cabin was historically home to barge workers and eventually squatters. It once housed people like artist Carole Itter and her partner, musician Al Neil.

"It was tucked into a bay and almost nobody could see it, which is how we wanted it," Itter said at Sunday's opening in False Creek. "It served us well. It was an incredible place to be."

A developer ordered it removed in 2015, and it was put in to storage to avoid demolition.

Programmers are still putting the final touches on the Blue Cabin. (CBC)

The cabin was renovated by a group of artists working alongside the Grunt Gallery, and more than $1 million was raised to move it and turn it into the Blue Cabin Floating Artist Residency for three years. 

The inaugural program will focus on Coast Salish weaving practices. Squamish Nation artists like Janice George and Buddy Joseph will share Indigenous language, stories and ceremony through weaving over the next year.

"We learn the techniques, yes, but we learn all of the spiritual and energetic things that go with it," George said. "I think it encourages people to look at their own culture."

Australian Indigenous artist and activist Vicki Couzens will be the first international artist in residence.

Couzens is scheduled to move in next month.

With files from Andrea Ross

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