British Columbia·Video

Bear photo-bombs Vancouver couple's wedding video

A Vancouver couple's wedding video was photo-bombed by an uninvited guest who nearly stole the whole show last weekend.

'We get these all the time in Whistler,' unflappable groom Faris Ataya pauses to say

A young bear photo-bombed a wedding video several times as it strolled back and forth while Clara and Faris Ataya were getting married on the grounds outside the Executive Hotel in Burnaby, B.C. Look behind the bride's arms to see the bear in the background or watch the video at the bottom of the story.

A Vancouver couple's wedding video was photo-bombed by an uninvited guest who nearly stole the whole show last weekend.

Clara and Faris Ataya were getting married outside near the Executive Hotel in Burnaby, B.C., when the young black bear strolled into the scene.

The bear was attracted to food left out on a picnic table. Despite the efforts of several wedding guests and the picnickers to scare it away, the bear kept walking back and forth behind the couple as they exchanged their wedding vows.

While a number of guests did panic when they saw the bear, the couple did not, and after a pause, continued with the ceremony.

The young bear, which was attracted to a nearby picnic, was eventually scared off when members of the whole wedding party approached it, clapping their hands loudly. (Executive Hotel Burnaby/YouTube)

"We see these all the time in Whistler," the unflappable groom can be heard saying.

The bear was finally scared off from the ceremony when the entire wedding party advanced toward it while clapping loudly. A conservation officer was called in, but it remains unclear if the bear was eventually found.

The couple had not originally planned to videotape the wedding, but the hotel made a last-minute decision to send a film crew for the purposes of a promotional video.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.