British Columbia

SPCA warns against deadly results of neutering pets at home

The BC SPCA is issuing a warning after two cats and a dog were found to be victims of an attempted home neutering in October. One of the cats didn't survive the injuries and infection stemming from the at-home procedure.

'The wounds on both cats were horrific'

The BC SPCA says Geiger barely survived his injuries and faces a long road to recovery. (BC SPCA)

The BC SPCA is issuing a warning after two cats and a dog were found to be victims of attempted home neuterings last month. One of the cats didn't survive the injuries and infection stemming from the at-home procedure.

Jodi Dunlop, manager of Vancouver's B.C. SPCA said the dog was found first and just a week later two brother cats were found on a Vancouver street suffering from the attempted procedure.

"Please do not attempt to ever neuter your own animal. It's horrific [and] it's an act of cruelty," Dunlop said.

She said spaying or neutering an animal is a surgery and is not ever to be done at home. 

"Someone had tried to do a home neuter and tied the genitals with elastic bands. The wounds on both cats were horrific," Dunlop said.

Gieger the cat is still being fostered by the B.C. SPCA as he recovers from an at-home neutering staff say is considered animal cruelty. (BC SPCA)

She said the one cat, Geiger, that survived out of the two brothers, faced genital mutilation.

Due to his injuries, Geiger required perineal urethrostomy (PU) surgery. Dunlop said it is a procedure that is most commonly done in male cats who suffer from feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD).

Dunlop said for those concerned about the cost of spaying or neutering, there are safe alternatives that still protect the animals.

"Reach out because there are organizations like us that will help people ... get their animals spayed and neutered," Dunlop said.

She says Geiger survived and is almost out of the woods with a "furever" home already waiting for him.

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