British Columbia

Attacker sent to prison for random stabbing spree in Vancouver

A B.C. man who randomly stabbed three strangers in the head or neck during a violent spree in Vancouver has been sentenced to seven years in prison.

Bradley Mazerolle was holding a Bible when he stabbed 3 strangers in March 2017

Bradley Mazerolle stabbed three strangers during morning rush hour on March 2, 2017. (Rafferty Baker/CBC)

A B.C. man who randomly stabbed three strangers in the head or neck during a violent spree in Vancouver has been sentenced to seven years in prison.

Bradley Michael Mazerolle, 36, was convicted earlier this year of three counts of aggravated assault for the attacks during morning rush hour on March 2, 2017.

In a sentencing decision handed down last week, provincial court Judge Reginald Harris said Mazerolle's crimes are worthy of strong denunciation.

"The offences were unprovoked and Mr. Mazerolle used a knife against unarmed individuals. All of the attacks were committed from behind, thus depriving the victims of the opportunity to defend themselves. Further, all of the attacks were random and without warning," Harris wrote.

With credit for time already served, Mazerolle's sentence has been reduced to three years and one month.

24 minutes of violence

On the morning of the attacks, witnesses saw Mazerolle reading a Bible in the ATM vestibule at the Coast Capital Savings on West Broadway near Cambie, the trial heard.

Courier Keenan Moore happened upon him while he was making his daily deliveries to banks in the neighbourhood. He had to ask Mazerolle to move to the side so he could access a lock box, but said there was no indication Mazerolle was upset or aggressive.

But when Moore left the credit union, Mazerolle followed. He approached Moore from behind and stabbed him on the top of his head with a butcher knife. When Moore raised an arm to protect himself, Mazerolle stabbed him in the hand as well.

The next attack happened moments later on Quebec Street, where Mazerolle rushed up behind David Allardice and stabbed him once in the head.

Mazerolle then walked up Main Street, where he stabbed a third man in the back of the neck just as the victim was stepping off the bus.

The victims were all attacked within 24 minutes. (Rafferty Baker/CBC)

The spree lasted just 24 minutes. Mazerolle was holding onto his Bible the entire time, according to the judge.

The stabbings left the victims with serious injuries and some lasting psychological effects.

The third victim, referred to as E.K. in court documents, had to spend seven days in hospital after the stabbing, and had a stroke six days after he was released.

Attack 'destroyed everything' for victim

In a victim impact statement, Moore said he has not been able to work since the attack.

"He describes the assault as having destroyed everything that he has worked for," Harris wrote.

"Mr. Moore reports that he can no longer provide for his family, that he is afraid to go outside, that he suffers from anxiety and an inability to sleep."

Mazerolle has previous convictions for crimes including assault with a weapon, assaulting a police officer, drug offences, threats and causing a disturbance, according to the sentencing decision.

After the stabbings, Mazerolle underwent several psychiatric assessments to confirm he was fit to stand trial. The experts who spoke with him said that he appeared to have some sort of mental disorder, but they couldn't pin down a diagnosis.

Harris wrote that Mazerolle's undiagnosed mental illness probably played a role in his crimes, and his time in prison will give him a chance to access psychiatric help.

As part of Mazerolle's sentence, he has been ordered to provide a DNA sample and is banned from possessing any firearms for 10 years.

About the Author

Bethany Lindsay

Journalist

Bethany Lindsay has more than a decade of experience in B.C. journalism, with a focus on the courts, health and social justice issues. She has also reported on human rights and crimes against humanity in Cambodia. Questions or news tips? Get in touch at bethany.lindsay@cbc.ca or on Twitter through @bethanylindsay.