British Columbia

Ex-Mountie 'gobsmacked' by comments about B.C.'s approach to crime in casinos, inquiry hears

A retired RCMP officer repeated his earlier testimony today at British Columbia's public inquiry into money laundering that former cabinet minister Kash Heed told him the government's gaming minister was aware of organized crime in casinos.

Fred Pinnock stands by testimony to Cullen Commission about conversations with former cabinet minister

Former Mountie Fred Pinnock maintains that he was told then-gaming minister Rich Coleman, shown here, was more concerned about making money for the government than fighting organized criminals. (Chad Hipolito/The Canadian Press)

A retired RCMP officer repeated his earlier testimony today at British Columbia's public inquiry into money laundering that former cabinet minister Kash Heed told him the government's gaming minister was aware of organized crime in casinos.

Fred Pinnock, who was under cross-examination by a lawyer representing Heed, testified he was "gobsmacked" in 2009 when Heed told him the gaming minister at the time was more concerned about making money for the government than fighting organized criminals.

Heed's lawyer, Peter Senkpiel, told the inquiry the former Liberal cabinet minister has concerns with Pinnock's recollection of the 2009 conversation and his interpretation of three recorded conversations he had with Heed in 2018.

Pinnock says his memory may have faded over time but the essence of Heed's comments to him in 2009 about former gaming minister Rich Coleman and organized crime at casinos is still clear to him.

Heed was granted limited status at the inquiry last week following Pinnock's earlier testimony.

The B.C. government appointed Supreme Court Justice Austin Cullen to lead the public inquiry into money laundering after three reports outlined how hundreds of millions of dollars in illegal cash affected the province's real estate, luxury vehicle and gaming sectors.

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

now