B.C. attorney general says liquor distribution rules could be reformed

The comment came Friday after whiskey bars in several B.C. cities were raided by government agents last week.

Lawyer is currently reviewing B.C.'s rules around liquor distribution

One bar in Vancouver saw over 200 bottles of single malt whisky confiscated last week. (Tina Lovgreen/CBC)

B.C.'s attorney general says changes could be on the way to the province's liquor distribution laws.

David Eby's comments came Friday after whiskey bars in several B.C. cities were raided by government agents last week.

The raids followed complaints the bars were serving liquor bought outside B.C.'s Liquor Distribution Branch — which is against provincial law.

"It seems to be to be an important issue that bars or restaurants that specialize in exotic products that they can't get through the public wholesaler, that they should be able to access that product legally," Eby said on a call with reporters.

"But that is an issue of law reform, and that law reform has not happened yet."

Bar owners have said the bottles weren't available for purchase in bulk from the province. Eby admitted some laws may need to be changed.

He has appointed attorney Mark Hicken to review B.C.'s liquor policies. He is presently working with bar owners to outline potential changes to the current laws.

Until that happens, Eby is urging all retailers to respect the rules as they currently stand.

With files from Jon Hernandez