British Columbia

Lab tech who found B.C.'s 1st case of COVID-19 recalls 'sheer terror' of discovery

In the early days of the pandemic, Rebecca Hickman would carefully watch each sample being tested for the novel coronavirus in her lab at the B.C. Centre for Disease Control.

Rebecca Hickman recalls positive case that launched more than a year of 'instability and craziness'

Laboratory technologist Rebecca Hickman discovered the first positive case of COVID-19 in B.C. (Christian Amundson/CBC)

In the early days of the pandemic, Rebecca Hickman would carefully watch each sample being tested for the novel coronavirus in her lab at the B.C. Centre for Disease Control.

"I was so afraid of getting a positive," the public health laboratory technologist told CBC this week.

That meant she was paying close attention as the first test came back positive at about 3:30 p.m. on Jan. 27, 2020.

"I actually started to see it get positive within a few seconds," Hickman recalled. "My first feeling was sheer terror, from a personal point of view."

The co-designer of B.C.'s test, medical laboratory technologist Tracy Lee, was in a meeting as the results were coming in. She remembers getting a call from Hickman and rushing to the lab to watch the test complete.

Lee felt "both fear and relief" as the test came back positive — fear for what this meant for the people of B.C., but relief that the test was working as planned.

Hickman shared those mixed emotions.

"To design, validate and implement a molecular laboratory test usually takes months if not years, and so to do that in the span of days is a huge achievement," Hickman said.

There was also some excitement. She said she "felt like I was a part of something huge."

Hickman spent the rest of that first afternoon sequencing a portion of the genome from the positive sample, and by midnight the lab had confirmed it was SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for COVID-19.

B.C. CDC laboratory technologists Tracy Lee and Rebecca Hickman worked together to design the initial COVID-19 test to detect the virus in B.C. It is still being used today. (Michael Donoghue/BCCDC)

It had been a 16-hour workday.

"I went home and slept for five hours, then came back," she recalls.

The next day, British Columbians watched as Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry confirmed the inevitable. The virus was here in B.C.

"This is the first time in my life I've ever found things out before I read it in the news," Hickman said.

'Instability and craziness'

A year later, B.C. has confirmed 66,779 cases of the novel coronavirus and 1,189 people have died.

Hickman has gone from anxiously checking the totals after the daily afternoon update from health officials to barely noticing as B.C. records hundreds of cases each day. She says COVID fatigue is real.

There have been difficult times, like in the spring when lab supplies and personal protective equipment began to run out.

"The instability and craziness of it all has been the hardest part," Hickman said.

Watch: Rebecca Hickman recalls finding B.C.'s first case of COVID-19

Lab tech recalls 'sheer terror' of discovering B.C.'s 1st COVID-19 case

CBC News BC

4 months ago
1:11
Rebecca Hickman was just nine months into her new job at the B.C. Centre for Disease Control when she confirmed B.C.'s first case of the novel coronavirus. 1:11

Today, much of her time is spent doing whole genome sequencing for about 15 to 20 per cent of COVID-19 cases.

That work helps health officials track the new, more infectious variants that have popped up in different parts of the world. It's also used for outbreak response — scientists can determine how the virus is spreading through a community or health-care facility and whether cases are being introduced from new sources.

Hickman was just nine months into her job at the B.C. CDC when she discovered the first case.

She said she's proud to have played a part in such a major moment in history.

"It has been easily the most difficult year of my life but also the most fulfilling. What we have achieved here over the last year is huge," Hickman said.

With files from Tina Lovgreen

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