British Columbia

B.C. gangster Jarrod Bacon to be released from prison in late August

As the infamous B.C. gangster Jarrod Bacon prepares to leave prison on statutory release for a third time, the Parole Board of Canada is imposing several conditions upon him to protect society and facilitate his reintegration.

Parole board orders Bacon, 37, to stay away from drugs and live in an approved facility

Jarrod Bacon was convicted for conspiracy to traffic cocaine after getting caught trying to smuggle $3 million worth of cocaine into Canada in 2009. (CBC)

As the infamous B.C. gangster Jarrod Bacon prepares to leave prison on statutory release for a third time, the Parole Board of Canada says he must live in a community correctional centre for six months.

When Bacon, 37, is released from federal custody on Aug. 28 he will have several conditions imposed on him by the parole board, including where he lives and a ban on using drugs or alcohol and associating with criminals. 

In the reasons for the decision to release Bacon, the parole board acknowledged his long criminal history and current ties to the Red Scorpions and Bacon Brothers criminal organizations. 

"Reports are that you remain an influential individual with very solid connections with the Hell's Angels. Those concerns are still valid as of May 2020," read the report. 

'Not engaged in a real process of change'

"According to your Case Management Team (CMT), you have a potential for violence that must not be overlooked."

The board noted that two out of three offenders with the same characteristics as Bacon will not reoffend within three years of release, which is considered a low-moderate risk. However, the board said it could not see that he made progress to reduce that risk. 

"According to the Preventive Security Department, while incarcerated, you maintained connections with inmates known to be affiliated with the Hell's Angels. You also displayed a violent behaviour towards inmates, not to mention a possible involvement in illicit activities."

"Your continued affiliation with criminal groups and your connection with inmates involved in illicit activities in the institution suggest to the board that you are not engaged in a real process of change."

Conspiracy to traffic cocaine

In 2012, Bacon was convicted for conspiracy to traffic cocaine after getting caught trying to smuggle $3 million worth of cocaine into Canada in 2009.

Bacon originally received a 12-year sentence that May, which was appealed by the Crown and then increased to 14 years by the B.C. Court of Appeal.

After time served in pre-trial custody that amounted to a final sentence of nine years and two months.

Bacon was first granted statutory release erroneously in Feb. 2017, but it was suspended that July after he breached special conditions related to avoiding bars and associating with criminal peers. 

His statutory release was revoked, but later that decision was cancelled after the parole board discovered it did not have the authority to release Bacon in the first place, because an administrative error had led to a miscalculation of his eligibility for release. 

He was then released again in June 2018 with conditions on residency and drug use, but after testing positive for cocaine his release was suspended and eventually revoked in June 2019.
 
Bacon will have to report to a parole officer on a regular basis, and can be sent back to prison if he is believed to present an undue risk to the public. 

Unless changed or removed by the parole board his release conditions will remain in effect until his sentence ends on July 3, 2021. 

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