British Columbia

Should B.C. keep or drop daylight time? The province wants your input

B.C. Premier John Horgan says it's time to consider it as legislators in Washington, Oregon and California are pushing to dump the clock change.

The government is accepting feedback by survey or email until July 19

Studies show the time change comes with drawbacks, including decreased productivity and a spike in traffic accidents. (Elisa Amendola/Associated Press)

Now's your chance to tell the B.C. government whether to keep changing our clocks twice a year or call it quits.

Starting Monday, you can answer an online survey and email your thoughts about daylight time.

Most provinces in Canada move their clocks ahead one hour in March and turn their clocks back one hour in November. 

But the B.C. government has mused in recent years about abandoning the seasonal time changes.

B.C. Premier John Horgan says it's time to consider it as legislators in Washington, Oregon and California are pushing to dump the clock change, which hinges on approval from the U.S. Congress.

"I know many people will have strong preferences on this complex question, and this is an opportunity to express them and help government decide our next steps," Horgan said Monday in a news release.

Studies show springing forward comes with drawbacks, including decreased productivity and a spike in traffic accidents.

A 2014 study out of the University of Colorado found a 25-per-cent increase in the risk of heart attack the Monday after the start of daylight time.

B.C. held a public consultation on daylight time in 2007 and received more than 4,000 responses. 

At the time, 92 per cent of respondents were in favour of changing how B.C. observes daylight time, as long as it aligns with similar changes in other Canadian provinces and U.S. states.

The survey is open till July 19.

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