British Columbia

B.C. truckers too fatigued: U.S. authorities

Dozens of B.C. trucking companies are regularly breaking the rules by allowing working conditions that fatigue drivers, a CBC News investigation has found.

Tired truck drivers

11 years ago
Duration 2:15
Dozens of B.C. companies have been red-flagged in the U.S. for letting their truckers drive while tired, the CBC's Lisa Johnson reports

Dozens of B.C. trucking companies are regularly breaking the rules by allowing working conditions that fatigue drivers, a CBC News investigation has found.

As a result, 73 B.C. companies have been put on "alert" by U.S. transportation authorities for having too many serious driving violations.

The U.S. Department of Transportation recently made all trucking safety records public, showing which B.C. regularly break their rules by either requiring or permitting drivers to stay on the road for too many consecutive hours.

'These drivers are pushing it to no end.'—Gregg Tutt of G. Tutt Transport Ltd.

Chilliwack trucking executive Gregg Tutt acknowledged that his company's practices have to be altered.

"This has made us more aware of what's going on," said Tutt, who owns G. Tutt Transport Ltd. "We have to change that."

Tutt is expecting an audit from the U.S. authorities next month because his company had one of the worst safety ratings possible for driver fatigue - 96.2 on a scale of 100.

Tutt said that one-third of the violations were committed by drivers who no longer work for him.

But he insisted his company is working to improve conditions despite financial pressure to drive longer hours.

"These drivers are pushing it to no end. It's our problem to do our due diligence to police them."

Tutt's company and others with bad records in the U.S. still have "satisfactory" safety ratings in Canada.

But Canadian regulators don't give public access to the safety records of truckers on our roads.

Trucking accidents kill 400 people in Canada each year and injure another 7,000, but the numbers don't show how many of those accidents may be caused by tired drivers.

With files from the CBC's Lisa Johnson

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