British Columbia

B.C. teachers' strike: SFU, UBC consider extending deadlines

Both Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia are considering extending deadlines for applications from B.C. students if the public school teachers' strike drags on, but for now, it's business as usual.

Universities across Canada take a wait-and-see approach for B.C. applications

The University of British Columbia says as long as it receives some grades by March, the admission process for students in B.C. won't change significantly. (UBC)

Both Simon Fraser University and the University of British Columbia are considering extending deadlines for applications from B.C. students if the public school teachers' strike drags on, but for now, it's business as usual.

UBC says as long as it receives some grades by March, the admission process won't change significantly.

SFU registrar Mark Walker says admissions won't be affected if classes resume by December.

 "As long as classes are back in school at a reasonable time from now ... and [students] have grades to self-report during the admission cycle, really nothing would change in how we treat the files."

Walker says SFU will even consider looking at Grade 11 scores as a last resort, but notes that students who miss Grade 12 classes will be at a disadvantage academically.

"The more Grade 12 courses they have, and the ability to prepare for them, the better they'll be when it comes to university," says Walker.

Meanwhile, in Kingston, Ont., the admissions office at Queen's University says it is monitoring the teachers' strike and will see how the strike plays out before it decides what to do.

More than 10 per cent of the 2014 class was from B.C.

The University of Toronto says it's also in wait-and-see mode, but that it still expects to get mid-term and final grades on time.

With files from Farrah Merali

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