British Columbia

B.C. massage therapist accused of sexting during appointments banned from treating women

A registered massage therapist in B.C.'s Okanagan region has been blocked from treating female patients while under investigation for allegations he sexted during appointments and sneaked glimpses of patients' exposed bodies.

College of Massage Therapists is investigating allegations of sexual misconduct by Brent Rowland

The College of Massage Therapists of B.C. is investigating allegations that Brent Rowland committed sexual misconduct. (Prostock-studio/Shutterstock)

A registered massage therapist in B.C.'s Okanagan region has been blocked from treating female patients while under investigation for allegations he sexted during appointments and sneaked glimpses of patients' exposed bodies.

In a public notice last week, the College of Massage Therapists of B.C. said it launched an investigation into Brent Rowland's conduct based on information from the public and is satisfied there is "a prima facie case of sexual misconduct."

The notice says that the college's inquiry committee, which conducts investigations, found that "the allegations are serious and there is a real risk of harm to patients if Mr. Rowland were allowed to continue to practise without restriction."

The college is investigating whether Rowland, who is based in Naramata, sent sexual images and messages to a third party during his appointments, and if he looked at women's unclothed bodies while lifting the draping sheets when they rolled over on the massage table.

The college says the evidence of sexual misconduct is "not manifestly unfounded, unreliable or exaggerated."

Registered massage therapist Brent Rowland practises in the Okanagan. (DiscoverNaramata.com)

According to the college, an investigation is also underway related to alleged "conduct unbecoming" by Rowland, but there is no immediate risk to the public in relation to that charge.

None of the allegations against Rowland have been proven.

In an email to CBC, he described them as unfortunate and said he understands why the college needs to be cautious about protecting the public.

"I sincerely regret that the College has found it necessary to act in such a way in this instance. I know that many people assume that anyone accused of a wrongdoing is automatically guilty. All I can say is that I plan to co-operate fully with the investigation, and I hope it can proceed as quickly as possible," he wrote.

 

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