British Columbia

B.C. is greenest province in Canada: Earth Day report card

British Columbia is the greenest province in Canada while Prince Edward Island is the least environmentally friendly, according to a countrywide report set for release on Wednesday, which is Earth Day.

P.E.I. gets lowest marks in rankings by Corporate Knights magazine

British Columbia is the greenest province in Canada while Prince Edward Island is the least environmentally friendly, according to a countrywide report set for release on Wednesday, which is Earth Day.

The first Green Provincial Report Card published by the quarterly magazine Corporate Knights, which covers corporate responsibility, looked at 10 environmental categories, including greenhouse gases, green energy, water use, biodiversity and car dependency.

B.C. received a score of 69 per cent, a C+, while Ontario was ranked second best at 67 per cent. The Northwest Territories was the only other region to receive the C+ designation, scoring 66 per cent.

B.C. topped the list when it came to green jobs, green buildings, organic food and energy efficiency, said editor in chief Toby Heaps.

"Our hope is that this clear presentation of provincial eco-performance will be seized upon by leaders across Canada looking to ramp up their region's eco-resiliency," he said.

Although the report's authors claim their methodology did adjust for size of population and economy, Prince Edward Island came in last, with a grade of F and a score of 32 per cent.

The province lagged behind because of what the survey's authors called its poor energy efficiency, high car dependency, extreme paucity of protected land and a dearth of certified green buildings.

"The ability to seize green economic opportunities will be the fundamental driver for which societies rise and fall in the 21st century," Heaps said.

One notch above P.E.I. was Newfoundland and Labrador, which scored 38 per cent. New Brunswick came in just ahead at 40 per cent.

Manitoba and Quebec were the other two provinces to get F grades.

Green image

Quebec's result is in contrast to the clean image often associated with La belle province, the authors said.

"While Quebec's abundance of large hydro dams powered it to the pinnacle of carbon efficiency per unit of economic output, in the areas of biodiversity, water use and sustainable forestry management, Alberta scored twice as high as Quebec," Heaps said.

Alberta picked up a grade of C- and a score of 55 per cent, just behind Nunavut, which scored 56 per cent. The Yukon also registered a C-, scoring 57 per cent.

Nova Scotia and Saskatchewan both got grades of D.

The report said research was conducted through a combination of online research and informal expert interviews, with the majority of data being collected from federal government websites and reports.