British Columbia

B.C. community fearful after new threat from purported bomber

Residents near the B.C.-Alberta border are on edge after their community was mentioned in a letter that appears to be from someone connected to a series of pipeline bombings in the area.
This is the envelope that held a letter threatening EnCana, received by the Dawson Creek Daily News. ((RCMP))
Residents near the B.C.-Alberta border are on edge after their community was mentioned in a letter that appears to be from someone connected to a series of pipeline bombings in the area.

On Wednesday, a local newspaper received its second letter since October related to six bombings targeting EnCana pipelines and wellheads in northeastern B.C.

In addition to referencing the attacks and demanding EnCana shuts down its operations in the area, the letter sent to the Dawson Creek Daily News also mentioned the company's "fancy gas plant" at the nearby Kelly Lake Métis Settlement, near Pouce Coupe.

Lyle Letendre, who lives on the settlement, said the community would be devastated by an attack.

He and 160 others live mere kilometres from an active sour gas pipeline.

"If he [the bomber] does it today, the outcome is very real of losing a lot of people," Letendre said. "We would literally be wiped out. We got five generations in the settlement and that would all be gone."

Bomber likely from a nearby community, police say

A saboteur's bomb blast last Oct. 12 created a 1.8-metre-wide crater near an EnCana natural-gas pipeline about 50 kilometres east of Dawson Creek in northern B.C. ((CBC))
RCMP Sgt. Tim Shields has said many in the community consider the letters a form of blackmail, and the threat has "ratcheted up the level of fear" among local residents.

He said investigators have tried to speak with a number of people who police have identified as "people of interest," but they have refused to co-operate.

Shields said it is likely people in the area know who the bomber is.

"We are operating on the premise that the bomber is someone who is extremely familiar with that local community, who likely lives there," Shields said.

The RCMP's anti-terrorism unit has been investigating the bombings, but so far no one has been charged.

The letter warned EnCana that if it doesn't shut down its operations in northeastern B.C. within three months, the bombings would get worse.

Letendre said that's something he doesn't want to see happen.

"There is other ways to solve things, and I really hope in my heart that he [the bomber] will find a different way to do this."

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