British Columbia

Anti-racism protest blocking Georgia viaduct stretches into second day

An anti-racism protest blocking the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts has stretched into a second day, with a small group of peaceful protestors lining the streets in the rain.

Area around viaducts has historic significance to the city's Black community

Protestors have vacated the west entrances and exits, which are being held by VPD officers. (Cory Correia/CBC)

An anti-racism protest blocking the Georgia and Dunsmuir viaducts has stretched into a second day, with a small group of peaceful protestors lining the streets in the rain.

The group has declined to comment to CBC News but to say that the protest is peaceful, and is in solidarity with Black Lives Matter and the movement to defund police forces.

Vancouver Police said the nature of the protest is largely unchanged since Saturday, and that they are monitoring the traffic disruption. Access to several adjacent roads has been blocked since around 7 a.m. PT on Saturday, though local residents are permitted access.

Protestors have vacated the west entrances and exits, which are being held by VPD officers.

Signs held by the protestors include messages like "defund the police," and "defund white supremacy."

Blocking access to the viaduct is symbolic, as the area has historic significance to the city's Black community. The area —  centred between Prior and Union and Main and Jackson — was known as Hogan's Alley.

It was a cultural hub for Black businesses and culture, until it was dismantled in the 1960s to make way for the viaduct.

Blocking access to the viaducts is symbolic, as the area has historic significance to the city's Black community. (Cory Correia/CBC)

The protest is the latest in a series of nation-wide demonstrations against police brutality.

On Saturday, more than 100 people gathered in downtown Vancouver calling for justice for Chantel Moore, an Indigenous woman from B.C. who was shot and killed by police in Edmundston, N.B.

Thousands have also demonstrated in other Canadian cities, including Victoria, Toronto, and Montreal.

Since the death of George Floyd while in police custody in the U.S., police in North America have been facing greater scrutiny of their treatment of minorities and use of violence.

Protests in solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement have been held in every American state, and around the world.

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