British Columbia

Campfire and angling bans lifted in parts of B.C.

Angling is once again allowed in most streams and rivers on British Columbia's south coast. Meanwhile, a ban on open fires has been lifted in two more B.C. regions.

Streams, rivers across South Coast were closed to angling on July 22 due to high temperatures and low flows

Angling still remains prohibited in the Seymour and Coquihalla rivers and their tributaries where rock slides have threatened the upstream migration of steelhead. (Jamie Lusch/ Mail Tribune via AP)

Angling is once again allowed in most streams and rivers on British Columbia's South Coast. Meanwhile, a ban on open fires has been lifted in two more B.C. regions.

Streams and rivers across the south coast were closed to angling on July 22 because the province feared higher water temperatures and low flows could threaten fish health.

The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations says it can now rescind the closure in most streams because of recent rainfall and lower temperatures.

But angling still remains prohibited in the Seymour and Coquihalla rivers and their tributaries.

The ministry says rock slides into those waterways have threatened the upstream migration of steelhead.

The angling prohibition was lifted two weeks earlier than the province anticipated.

Campfire ban lifted

The ban on open fires, burn barrels, fireworks and tiki torches has been lifted in two more British Columbia regions
due to the decreased risk of forest fires.

People who plan to do any open burning should check with their local governments to ensure there are no restrictions. (Craig F. Walker/The Denver Post/The Canadian Press)

The BC Wildfire Service says its ban in the Coastal Fire Centre ended at noon Monday.

It says the ban will partially end in the Kamloops Centre at noon Tuesday, allowing open burning in the Clearwater zone and in the Salmon Arm zone in areas above 1,200 metres.

The ban will remain in all other areas of the Salmon Arm zone until Oct. 1, and in Kamloops, Vernon, Penticton, Merritt and Lillooet until Oct. 15.

The wildfire service says its decisions only apply to provincial parks, Crown and private lands but not municipalities, which have their own bylaws.

It says people who plan to do any open burning should check with their local governments to ensure there are no restrictions.

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