British Columbia

9-year-old boy raises $3K to keep hospital workers going with snacks

Bear Yeung kicked off his fundraiser with $70 of his own money after speaking with a friend of his father's, an ER doctor who said hospital staff work long hours and need nutritious food and electrolytes to sustain them.

Bear Yeung's father says his son's efforts show there are many ways to help the fight against COVID-19

Bear Yeung, 9, loaded up his parents' car with healthy snacks and beverages to donate to front-line workers at the Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver. (Submitted by Kevin Yeung)

A nine-year-old boy in North Vancouver who wanted to help the fight against COVID-19 has raised more than $3,000 for healthy snacks to keep health-care workers going at Lions Gate Hospital. 

Bear Yeung kicked off his fundraiser with $70 of his own money after speaking with a friend of his father's, an ER doctor who said hospital staff work long hours and need nutritious food and electrolytes to sustain them.

Bear's father, Kevin Yeung, says he's never been more proud of his son. 

"It showed the little guy has compassion," Kevin Yeung said.

"He realizes this is a very serious matter and I guess the problem-solving side of him figured that maybe he can do something ... about it."

Yeung says Bear got on the phone and called friends near and far, asking for donations. After he raised about $2,000, another friend of the family helped set up an online donation page and he was able to raise another $1,000. 

"He literally just asks everyone. And people have been very receptive," Yeung said.

Bear loaded up his parents' car with about $400 worth of food, such as Kind and Cliff bars, as well as electrolyte drinks like Gatorade and coconut water. The first shipment was dropped off across the street from the hospital, to follow safety procedures, and they'll do the same for subsequent loads. 

"It's really our hope that Bear can inspire others," Yeung said. "This is a fight and there's many ways that people can help."

With files from Max Collins

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